anotherpersonontheinternet:

DAAAMN
itscalledfutbol:

Robin van Persie’s World Cup goal against Spain
Spain 1-1 Netherlands (13/6/2014)

itscalledfutbol:

Robin van Persie’s World Cup goal against Spain

Spain 1-1 Netherlands (13/6/2014)

afootballreport:

The Group of Opportunity

It could have been boring, mundane, even uneventful. It could have been straightforward, unexciting, deserving of a shrug of the shoulders and a “meh.” A second consecutive kind World Cup draw for the U.S. Men’s national team, this time perhaps in the “Group of Life” with Switzerland, Ecuador and France, may have provided more room for comfort and confidence for American fans ahead of June, but may as well have offered less to truly capture the imagination of the neutral.

What the United States - as well as Germany, Portugal, and Ghana - have gotten instead, if not the toughest group in Brazil 2014, is the most drama-filled pairing of them all. For a spectacle that comes just once every four years, Friday’s draw at the Costa do Sauípe Resort in Bahia provided three match-ups that are truly worth the wait.

As Jozy Altidore said after the draw, "this isn’t the Group of Death, but a Group of Opportunity."

Read More

afootballreport:

What do we know about concussions? Not enough.

Arsene Wenger did the math for us. “You have only one life,” Arsenal’s manager told reporters, “and you have 60 games per year.”  He was here before, just weeks before. Midfielder Mathieu Flamini clashed heads with a defender and collapsed on the pitch. That time, Wenger did not hesitate to take Flamini out of the game. This time, the doctors didn’t tell him anything about Wojciech Szczesny. They needed just 82 seconds to check his signs and ask the relevant questions: Where are we right now? Who scored last? Which half is it?

The Arsenal goalkeeper had fallen down, seemingly unconscious, lying on the ground with his hands up. This time, Wenger’s player pushed on – Szczesny made some more saves and looked fine, a victory alone even in a game that Arsenal lost to Manchester United.

Doctors say there is no average: Every case is different. Minutes later, Nemanja Vidic, United’s captain, smacked his head against his own goalkeeper’s thigh. This was worse. As he fell to the ground, Vidic looked glassy-eyed, a vacant look on his face. He wobbled off the field, left for the hospital, and on Monday he was released.

The earliest Vidic can play is November 24. By virtue of his club’s schedule, he will automatically get to sit out at least five days – the minimum for any player concussed in the Premier League. But the waiting could last. We just don’t know how long.

And this was just the latest incident in England, if handled a little better. Only last week, Hugo Lloris, the Tottenham goalkeeper, took a knee to the face. The whiplash was violent: The head snapped back, and he was out. Minutes passed before he got up, and when he was told he had to go off, Lloris looked like a man insulted. The manager, Andre Villas-Boas, liked what he saw, the determination and the fight to stay in the game, and so Lloris remained, and he made a couple more saves.

“The call always belongs to me,” said Villas-Boas. He wasn’t immediately given signs from the doctors that indicted Lloris could continue, and yet he did. Villas-Boas didn’t even heed the weak rules already in place: That a player knocked unconscious should not play that same day.

It seems like an epidemic. Concussions make up 11% of injuries in football, or at least that’s the finding in last year’s British Journal of Sports Medicine. An average of one player per squad takes a hit to the head every month. It’s happening a lot more at the highest level, and more than 50% of clubs in England don’t follow the guidelines. They are talking about it, at meetings between FIFA, the International Ice Hockey Federation, the International Olympic Committee and the NFL. But are they doing enough?

Read More

I hope this gets much more attention.

Racism in Soccer: A Discussion with Lilian Thuram
Friday, November 8th, 6:30 p.m.
Location: NYU School of Law
Co-sponsored with Institute of African American Affairs and Institute for Public Knowledge
Lilian Thuram helped lead France to its first World Cup title and the European championship. Today, the Fondation Lilian Thuram has developed a curriculum for anti-racist education. More >

Racism in Soccer: 
A Discussion with Lilian Thuram

Friday, November 8th, 6:30 p.m.

Location: NYU School of Law

Co-sponsored with Institute of African American Affairs 
and Institute for Public Knowledge

Lilian Thuram helped lead France to its first World Cup title and the European championship. Today, the Fondation Lilian Thuram has developed a curriculum for anti-racist education. More >

inventfootball:

kicktv:

Fútbol meets Football

Rabonside kick!

inventfootball:

kicktv:

Fútbol meets Football

Rabonside kick!

sweetcocoatakky:

talk of the town!!

sweetcocoatakky:

talk of the town!!

afootballreport:

Brazil, it’s time to catch up in the race to 2014

“[Brazil] will be ready because it is the World Cup and no one can afford not to be ready for the World Cup.” - Sepp Blatter

Sepp, that’s just not how things work. The timetable of preparedness for the World Cup is against Brazil. We’re all going to try to go to the World Cup regardless of the levels of chaos, but we’ve all spoken with our Brazilian friends. The response from the World Cup hosts’ countrymen / voices of reason is the same: it’s going to be a mess.

Now, you expect a mess when the whole world throws a party for a month straight, but it’s rarely been this bad this close to the tournament. Only two of six stadiums are ready for the Confederations Cup in June.

Most recently, the Brazilian government has called upon the United Nations to assist with meeting deadlines for construction. As Reuters reports, “The Brasilia government signed this week a 35 million reais ($17.61 million) agreement with two U.N. agencies under which they will procure services and items such as tents, generators and security cameras for the stadium… The U.N.’s main advantage: It can acquire goods and services without going through the complex and lengthy procurement process required by the Brazilian government.”

Calling upon the UN is a desperate measure, but hopefully one that finally motivates the South Americans to get their act together. Brazil wants to truly showcase its standing as an emerging power, and - perhaps unfortunately - we’re all watching closely. [For more on the progress, or lack thereof, in Brazil, be sure to give our friend Chistopher Gaffney (Academic Geographer and Investigative Journalist) a follow. Posted by Eric]

afootballreport:

The long road to recovery
“With concussions, the hardest part was just sort of the unknown. There isn’t anything the doctors can do for you besides give you advice. As far as treating your body and giv[ing] your brain the adequate rest that it needs, there’s no ligament you can repair. Nothing like that so that was the hardest part for me, the uncertainty, kind of, you know, the constantness of my symptoms.”
Over at Dynamo Theory, Houston Dynamo player Calen Carr talks about the effects of concussions, MLS’ league-wide response strategy, and the road to recovery. If we’re going to begin a dialogue about concussions, we have to start somewhere. Right? [Posted by Maxi]

afootballreport:

The long road to recovery

“With concussions, the hardest part was just sort of the unknown. There isn’t anything the doctors can do for you besides give you advice. As far as treating your body and giv[ing] your brain the adequate rest that it needs, there’s no ligament you can repair. Nothing like that so that was the hardest part for me, the uncertainty, kind of, you know, the constantness of my symptoms.”

Over at Dynamo Theory, Houston Dynamo player Calen Carr talks about the effects of concussions, MLS’ league-wide response strategy, and the road to recovery. If we’re going to begin a dialogue about concussions, we have to start somewhere. Right? [Posted by Maxi]

Fans at the international airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti take in the Real Madrid-Barcelona match. Onscreen is Cristiano Ronaldo being fouled.

Photo by @dejiridoo

Fans at the international airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti take in the Real Madrid-Barcelona match. Onscreen is Cristiano Ronaldo being fouled.

Photo by @dejiridoo

footysphere:

Wembley empties after the recent England v Brazil fixture
Wembley Flow by ~JaanusJ

footysphere:

Wembley empties after the recent England v Brazil fixture

Wembley Flow by ~JaanusJ

TV rights and wrongs: The impact of broadcasting deals on Europe’s top clubs

vuvuzealots:

image

Spain’s big two lead the way once again, and a renegotiation of contracts mean a new influx of cash, but are certain regions over-reliant on this trend continuing?