Posts tagged futbol

Russian soccer fans walk protected by Polish riot police in Warsaw June 12, 2012. Russia will play Poland in their Euro 2012 Group A soccer tournament on Tuesday. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SPORT SOCCER CIVIL UNREST)
CREDIT: REUTERS
PUBLISHED DATE: 06/12/2012
(via Pictures and Galleries - AlertNet)

Russian soccer fans walk protected by Polish riot police in Warsaw June 12, 2012. Russia will play Poland in their Euro 2012 Group A soccer tournament on Tuesday. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND - Tags: SPORT SOCCER CIVIL UNREST)

CREDIT: REUTERS

PUBLISHED DATE: 06/12/2012

(via Pictures and Galleries - AlertNet)

The “Zozulitsa”, or “Zozu” for short, is described as Ukraine’s version of the Vuvuzela, as the country prepares to host the Euro 2012 Cup. This little ceramic bird-whistle is both a cultural tradition which goes back 7000 years, and is now turning into a commercial bonanza aimed at the tens of thousands of football fans expected to flock into the country this year.

I’ve always wondered how national teams compared to clubs. My sense is that, while they have amazing talent, most national teams don’t have the time to develop the complex tactics or on-field awareness of a club team that can practice hundreds of times in a year. What do you think?

I’ve always wondered how national teams compared to clubs. My sense is that, while they have amazing talent, most national teams don’t have the time to develop the complex tactics or on-field awareness of a club team that can practice hundreds of times in a year. What do you think?

Infographic: Bayern VS Chelsea: Can Chelsea Overcome The Odds

Infographic: Bayern VS Chelsea: Can Chelsea Overcome The Odds

LA Story Part One: Chivas USA

Anti-Galaxy

Chivas USA, to me, is a team that represents the American dream for all the immigrants, because Chivas USA represents the pueblo. El pueblo is like the main hardcore people of Los Angeles - which are people from Mexico, Puerto Rico… everybody – all the immigrants that come to the United States. Because that is what the name Chivas USA is telling you – we all came to live the American dream. Chivas USA represents all of those people, hard-working people, where the only thing we want is to succeed and to give our best to this country and honor Chivas in this league.”


Why we follow football

Few English fans are lifelong diehards. But nor are most glory hunters, who only watch winning teams. Rather, we found that most spectators go to watch a plausible team playing locally in a comfortable, safe stadium – winning matters less to them than having a pleasant experience.”

The businesses that refuse to die

Clubs almost never disappear. Yet each time a club declares insolvency – as happened 67 times in English football between 1982 and 2010 – there is a panic that it will disappear. The worriers tend to forget that insolvency laws were designed to save stricken companies. Insolvency is often an attractive option. It gives companies breathing space while they reorder their affairs. To fret about every insolvent club is to ignore the lessons of history.”


When are there two many cards in a game?

Cautions are intended for two main reasons. One is for punishment for the offense, and the other is to maintain game control. Remember this was a U-14 match. It should be possible for a referee of this experience to control the game without having to resort to this many yellow cards, especially in a game played in good spirits, that was never in danger of getting out of control. In this case the referee forgot the basic principle of who the game is for at this level and went somewhat heavy-handed in his management of the match.

I am not sure what this ad from designer Rachel Dunk is really about, but I like the soccer balls. -DBO
(via Rachael Dunk: Portfolio)

I am not sure what this ad from designer Rachel Dunk is really about, but I like the soccer balls. -DBO

(via Rachael Dunk: Portfolio)

runofplay:

Last week one of my Twitter followers replied in this way to one of my soccer tweets: “Why do you like soccer? Sports need to have a balance btw offense and defense. Soccer fails the test.”

Well, we’ve heard that one before. I didn’t reply, but if I had I would have said (of course) that he was failing to make the necessary distinction between offense and scoring. It’s a distinction that obtains in certain other sports — American football teams can run up a lot of yardage without scoring many points, and we’ve all seen baseball teams get thirteen hits and one run — but the distinction is fundamental only in soccer. 

Consider this video: one of the most famous and celebrated moments of offensive genius in the history of soccer, which ends with a shot dragged wide of an open goal. It’s impossible to imagine a failed play having this kind of stature in any other sport. 

But of course, it’s only a “failed play” according to the logic that equates offense and scoring. In the subtler accounting of soccer, Pelé’s split-millisecond decision, in one of the most heated of all possible heated moments, to let a rolling ball go right in front of his legs and past an onrushing keeper … it’s just brilliant beyond belief. And it even has its own diagram on Wikipedia.

Let’s re-set the scene. Estadio Jalisco, Guadalajara, Mexico; the semifinals of World Cup 1970. First, an utterly perfect pass from Tostão, curling slightly towards the streaking Pelé, creates a threefold convergence: the ball, Pelé, the Uruguayan keeper Mazurkiewicz. Pelé gets there just before Mazurkiewicz, who goes to ground, trying to make himself horizontally big to stop the cannonball of a shot he knows is coming. We’re all watching, we’re all doing the calculus — because calculus is what’s called for here, this is why Newton and Leibnitz invented it, to account for multiple bodies moving complicatedly in relation to one another — we’re wondering whether Pelé is going to get the shot off and whether he’ll try to chip it or blast it or take one touch to get around the prostrate Mazurkiewicz before clipping it into the back of the net … except, see, Pelé is better at calculus than anyone else and lets the ball just roll peacefully past the keeper. In an interview years later, he said“The dummy was a moment, just something you do. You can’t plan it, it happens, it’s a reaction.” But it was more than reaction: it was a high-speed feat of mathematical calculation, done while at a full sprint with a large black-clad body flinging itself at the calculator’s legs.

The calculator then has to make a sharp turn to fetch the ball, which he does. Mazurkiewicz’s part in the tale is over, but a lone Uruguayan defender has hustled back and gotten to the near post. The goal really is open, but not as open as it looks because of that defender’s intelligent placement of himself and the shallow angle Pelé now has to work with — it wasn’t a sitter by any means. But this is Pelé: he should have made it.

However, he missed. And the really wonderful and amazing thing is: it doesn’t matter. Yes, everyone says that it would have been the greatest goal ever if he had made it, but instead, it’s the greatest play ever. The most perfect embodiment of offensive footballing intelligence ever. Scoring doesn’t enter into it, really. The goal, made or missed, is but a coda to the real story here, which is in so many ways a story that simply defines what it is we love when we love soccer.

Alan Jacobs

Celtic hammered Kilmarnock 6-0 Saturday to clinch the Scottish championship.  Fans at the Manhattan Celtic Supporters Club celebrated at their home bar—Jack Demsey’s on 33rd St. between 5th Ave. and Broadway.

—Two Footed

On Throw-Ins

runofplay:

Why are soccer players so bad at throw-ins? In any given soccer match the rate of throw-in failure is shockingly high. The problems come in three general varieties.

Excess of ambition. A teammate stands unmarked five yards from the thrower-in, so that nothing would be easier than to toss the ball at his feet, receive a one-touch return, and then construct a possession. But no. The ambitious thrower-in scorns so simple a solution. He spies, right at or just beyond the range of his throwing prowess, another teammate surrounded by three opposing players. Yes, that’s the ticket. He heaves the ball in that direction and the other team gratefully takes possession. 

General lassitude. The thrower-in may be ready to do something sensible, but his teammates don’t give him a chance. They just stand around, usually too far away for him to throw the ball their way, keeping company with their markers. The thrower-in takes one hand off the ball to point them towards open spaces. Their chief response to this is to stare at him. After a few nervous moments one or two of them may slide an ineffectual yard this way or that. Eventually the ball gets tossed semi-randomly onto the pitch and the other team gratefully takes possession. 

Paralysis by analysis. An extreme form of the hesitation induced by either of the prior circumstances. Sometimes the thrower-in just can’t make a decision, either because of his own ambition or his teammates’ lassitude or, in some few cases, a deep-seated psychic disability, possibly induced by early experiences in candy stores. Symptoms here include spasmodic and incomprehensible gestures with one hand, as the other clutches the ball; swift, panicky twisting of the neck, accompanied by bulging eyes; and a crab-like creeping up the pitch (the most common variation on which resembles a beginner’s attempt to tango). Eventually the ball gets tossed semi-randomly onto the pitch etc. etc. 

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